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Project info

As I move through space I am perceived as healthy but inside of my body, my immune system mistakes my tendons, ligaments, and joints as invaders, and actively works to break them down.
This experience, while concealed, is one that has greatly shaped who I am as a person and is an experience from which I draw a lot of knowledge and power. In the same way that after exposure, the photographic paper needs to be submerged in developer for the image to appear, like alchemic magic, I am exploring the ways I can make my invisible identity known.
With the alternative photographic processes of chlorophyll printing, which uses UV light to print photographic images directly onto leaves, I am exploring how disease, illness, and corporeal diversity are represented and understood in society. I am interested in the disconnect in the way disability is most often understood as a purely negative experience and the way the fragility of nature is seen with a lens of reverence. The action of printing representations of disability onto leaves highlights the organic nature of disability, reframing it as a part of human diversity. The fact that chlorophyll prints are impermanent, and will continue to decay over time, asks the viewer to confront the bodily impermanence we all share. Printing my medical imagery reclaims my medicalized bodies and journey as a patient, creating a new sense of agency.