The night movers
Project info

Rail freight in countries with less than state-of-the art railway networks generally moves when passenger traffic is scarce so that passengers may not suffer a delay on route. This is particularly true in the case of Greece. Driving a freight train essentially means working the night shift, inside the cramped, noisy and dark cabin of an old locomotive. Drivers work in pairs so that one can rest while the other is driving. Despite this, it can be a lonely, sometimes even introspective affair that is challenging both physically and psychologically. The tracks that cross the country follow a very old mountainous route, one that you could probably call scenic by day but feels rather dangerous and eerie by night. Abandoned stations, trees that scrape the edges of the loco, ghostly tunnels, mysterious level crossings in the fields and alarming signalling lights amidst a dark background set the climate for this journey. In the project I followed a pair of drivers from the moment they arrived in the depot to take up their shift until they returned the next day early in the morning . Almost twelve consecutive hours spent in the driver's cab, hauling a kilometer long train. Almost twelve hours where very few words were actually spoken and each person was mostly consumed by his own thoughts. At the end I was left with the feeling that this is not a job for the faint of heart or the easily depressed. It is however a job that provides one with a certain feeling of freedom and independence, turning you into a bit like a modern day rail cowboy. A night mover...