• Beijing, China
About Claire Bayrasy

Born and raised in Paris from Chinese/Laotian parents, I spent most of my childhood trying to balance my own double identity. My personal history is intimately interwoven with my photographs, and my work is influenced by my experience of living both in and between cultures. A fervent traveler I have worked and lived in Canada, India and now China. I hold a Master's degree in Photo/Video Journalism from the University of Bolton (UK), and a Bachelor's degree in English Literature with a minor in Philosophy from the Sorbonne University in Paris.
As a child, I was more absorbed by poetry and philosophy. My interest in photography came at a later stage after I decided to move in Beijing in 2007. I wanted to be in the front row seats to witness China's frenetic pace to become number one. China has appeared as a fascinating background portraying the rich and the poor, the ruins and the skyscrapers, the void and the crowd. In that sense, photography has become a philosophical tool for me, and my intention is not to bring answers through visuals, but instead producing photographic meditations on China's contemporary issues.
My intention is to offer hints but never definitive answers, enabling us to construct our own stories. Attracted by the fissures and the patches behind China's glossy facades, and what's being cropped out and not photographed. I am trying to capture the encounter between the physical and the metaphysical, the beauty and the strangeness. Presenting images that operates beyond the confines of the traditional documentary aesthetic.
At heart I am a passionate storyteller that thrives from creative challenges. I have worked in the media and advertising industry for over 5 years with extensive experience in producing viral, promotional, corporate and documentary videos for international advertising agencies.
I am a list maker, a walker, and a documentary junkie, balancing my time between commercial assignments and self-initiated work.

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Claire Bayrasy's Projects on LensCulture