We first discovered this work after it was submitted to the Portrait Awards 2015. Although it was not chosen as a finalist by the jury, the editors of LensCulture were impressed and decided to publish this feature article about it. Enjoy!


A hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate military prestige by donning vintage uniforms historically exclusive to men. Highlighting uniforms from the Second Industrial Revolution until the end of the Weimar Republic, Eve’s Glory compares the ceremonial attitudes historically associated with the military to the proud independence of modern women.

Military uniforms are symbols of heroic and elite social status. The authentic uniforms belong to officers from several countries, symbolizing the strict value system of the period from 1868 to the 1930s. If women had been granted the same status as men, how would they have been perceived? Would society focus on delicate femininity or strength? Melting away the barriers by integrating women into this masculine world, this project questions the gender divide.

I am interested in challenging the conventional ways in which females are visually presented. Women in fashion magazines, TV commercials, and mainstream films are usually dressed in a way that speaks to a structure of social expectations. Characterized by a sharp division between masculinity and femininity, dominance and passivity, toughness and delicacy, women are narrowly defined. A woman in uniform is a visual impossibility.

Showing the contrast between two different worlds—the masculine and the feminine— Eve’s Glory deals with unique characters regardless of age, health, and origin to show women who fought their way through life and the young women who strive for their own path.

—A. Tamboly