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Hiroh Kikai Tokyo, Japan

After working in near obscurity for 30 years, Hiroh Kikai has emerged as a modern-day master portrait maker, patiently documenting eccentric people who pass through an old neighborhood in Tokyo that used to be the city's entertainment district. He's in the same league with Diane Arbus and August Sander. He speaks eloquently about his photographic practice in this great  interview by Marc Feustel.

No doubt, this the best photobook to be published in 2008. After working in near obscurity for 30 years, Hiroh Kikai has emerged as a modern-day master portrait maker, patiently documenting eccentric people who pass through an old neighborhood in Tokyo that used to be the city's entertainment district. He's in the same league with Diane Arbus and August Sander. Read the book review, plus a great interview with Kikai by Marc Feustel.
About Hiroh Kikai

Hiroh Kikai was born in Yamagata, Japan in 1945. He began to take photographs when the influential editor Shoji Yamagishi showed him photographs by Diane Arbus in 1969. The Hasselblad camera that he bought at the time is the camera that he still uses today. He became a freelance photographer in 1984. Living close to Asakusa in Tokyo, he often spent time there and the area became the location for a series of portraits that he has been shooting for over 30 years. Kikai’s other photographic subjects include working and residential neighborhoods in and near Tokyo, and street scenes in India and Turkey. His latest book, Asakusa Portraits, was published in 2008 by Steidl and the International Center of Photography.

Read more
Hiroh Kikai's Projects on LensCulture
Hiroh Kikai's Books